Wednesday, August 6, 2014

ARCI Press Release- U.S. Racing Drug Test Results Comparable to USADA & WADA Testing

Press Release Dated Wednesday, August 6, 2014
For Immediate Release
 
 
U.S. Racing Drug Test Results Comparable to USADA & WADA Testing
 
LEXINGTON, KY The results of anti-doping drugs tests conducted in 2013 by state racing commissions, the United States Anti-Doping Agency, and the World Anti-Doping Agency are “virtually identical” according to an analysis of all pertinent testing results.
 
“The numbers don’t lie,” said Racing Commissioners International President Ed Martin, noting that U.S. racing commissions sent 340,932[1] biological samples to a network of professional drug testing laboratories in 2013.
 
99.65% of those samples were found to have no violation.
 
By comparison, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) performed 9,197 doping control tests in 2013.[2] Of the samples tested, approximately 99.55% were determined to have no violation.[3]
 
In 2013, testing authorities reporting to the World Anti-Doping Association (WADA) performed 207,513 drug tests. Of that testing, 98.97% were found to have no adverse analytical finding.[4]
 
“The anti-doping testing effort of U.S. racing regulators is 60% larger than the entire world wide effort of WADA. Our program is thirty-seven times larger than the one operated by USADA,” Martin said.
 
“Drug testing oversight in racing is performed by government agencies not beholden to anyone but the public. We all have the same challenge and we are all combatting it the same way and our results are similar,” he noted. “All sports have a challenge with those who would deliberately rely on doping to affect performance. We must continue to be vigilant in detecting and developing tests for substances that emerge.”
 
In 2013, racing commissions cited a total of 1,140 medication rule violations. Of that number, 1.2% (14) were for the most egregious Class 1 doping substances; 5.9% (68) for Class 2 doping substances.
 
The overwhelming majority of violations - 60.3% (687) - were for overages of Class 4 and 5 substances considered therapeutic overages and not doping. 32.5% (371) of the violations were for Class 3 substances.
 
The following chart is a state by state breakdown of the results of racing commission drug testing conducted during 2013:
 
Jurisdiction
Drug Tests
Violations
Adverse Analytical Finding Rate (%)
Clear Rate (%)
Alabama
1,576
1
0.063
99.94
Arkansas (Failed to Report)
Arizona
5,518
28
0.507
99.49
California*
26,005
89
0.342
99.66
Colorado
1,176
3
0.255
99.74
Delaware Harness
4,504
3
0.067
99.93
Delaware Thoroughbred
1,889
8
0.424
99.58
Florida*
68,317
251
0.367
99.63
Iowa
9,825
24
0.244
99.76
Idaho
363
5
1.377
98.62
Illinois
13,817
30
0.217
99.78
Indiana
8,792
5
0.057
99.94
Kentucky
7,588
56
0.738
99.26
Louisiana
12,806
74
0.578
99.42
Massachusetts
4,805
23
0.479
99.52
Maryland
8,898
1
0.011
99.99
Michigan
1,936
20
1.033
98.97
Minnesota
4,523
18
0.398
99.60
Montana
61
3
4.918
95.08
North Dakota
106
0
0.000
100.00
Nebraska
970
3
0.309
99.69
New Jersey
9,611
22
0.229
99.77
New Mexico
3,061
51
1.666
98.33
Nevada
182
1
0.549
99.45
New York
53,136
67
0.126
99.87
Ohio
14,311
75
0.524
99.48
Oklahoma
8,308
42
0.506
99.49
Oregon
1,211
9
0.743
99.26
Pennsylvania
32,678
52
0.159
99.84
South Dakota
132
0
0.000
100.00
Texas
11,010
68
0.618
99.38
Virginia
1555
26
1.672
98.33
Washington
1,179
8
0.679
99.32
West Virginia
20,923
73
0.349
99.65
Wyoming
160
1
0.625
99.38
All Jurisdictions
340,932
1,140
0.334
99.67
* Fiscal Year 2012-2013
 
Comparison of Testing Results
 
 
U.S. Racing
USADA
WADA Worldwide
Number of Tests
340,932
9,197
207,513
Adverse Analytical Findings (Violations)
1,140
27 sanctioned + 8 referred + 7 pending
2,135
Clear Rate
99.67%
99.55%
98.97%
 
 
 
 


 
#####

Friday, February 28, 2014

RF Report- "In This Industry: Being Proactive is Necessary"


“In This Industry: Being Proactive is Necessary”
Remington Park and Racing Free Encourage Horsemen to be Proactive in 2014

GUTHRIE, OK- FEBRUARY 28, 2014--
Remington Park is one of the most progressive racetracks in our region of the country to face performance-enhancing drug issues and set standards for horsemen to abide by. Since 2013 Remington Park has put into place a new integrity policy, increased pre-race veterinary inspections, enhanced the track racing surface, and upgraded their television production technology; all with the mindset of improving the racing experience for horsemen and fans. Remington Park has been a pioneer supporter of Racing Free and this racing season will show a stronger alliance between Oklahoma's premier horse racing facility and Racing Free, promoting the renewed commitment to leveling the playing field of racing.
“Change is necessary. If we are going to continuing participating in this sport, there are some different directions that we need to go and Racing Free is right on the cusp of that.” stated Remington Park General Manager, Scott Wells.

While race tracks like Remington Park are doing their part to improve the sport, horsemen have the opportunity to be highly involved in the careers of race horses. Enhanced proactivity involves communicating with trainers, becoming educated on the medication thresholds, and voicing opinions with racing industry organizations. Being proactive in expressing medication standards will undoubtedly bring peace of mind in knowing that the horse's health is of utmost concern.

“We would like to thank Remington Park for taking so many steps towards providing a safe environment for equine athletes, jockeys, and racing fans. We hope to see hundreds of Racing Free horses winning big throughout the upcoming Quarter Horse meet.” stated Racing Free cofounder Micah McKinney.

In the end, both Remington Park and Racing Free can agree that it’s ultimately about the equine athletes and the integrity of horse racing.

"We've come to a time now where at least if we show that we are trying to help, people will recognize that we are horse lovers." Scott Wells.

Visit www.remingtonpark.com or www.racingfree.com for more information on how you can become more proactive in 2014.

###

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

NM Watchdog: More get-tough measures to stop horse racing cheats in NM

see full article here

More get-tough measures to stop horse racing cheats in NM
Posted By Rob Nikolewski On February 3, 2014 @ 6:20 pm In Capitol Report | No Comments
FOUR MORE: A Democrat and Republican in the Roundhouse have introduced four bills aimed at cracking down on those who drug racehorses in New Mexico.[1]
FOUR MORE: A Democrat and Republican in the Roundhouse have introduced four bills aimed at cracking down on those who drug racehorses in New Mexico.
By Rob Nikolewski │ New Mexico Watchdog
SANTA FE  – In another effort to clean up New Mexico‘s reputation in horse racing, four bills have been introduced in the current 30-day legislative session.
“If you’re a bad guy and you’re doping your horses, the tracks should be allowed to keep you off the grounds,” said state Sen. Mary Kay Papen, D-Las Cruces [2], who has introduced two bills in the Senate that mirror two bills in the House of Representatives introduced by Rep. Candy Spence Ezzell, R-Roswell [3].
“I’m tired of having the public duped over this,” Ezzell told New Mexico Watchdog [4]of bills aiming to get tough on trainers who drug their racehorses at the state’s five licensed race tracks. “I’m tired of them risking the lives of our horses, which are athletes, and our jockeys, which are athletes also … Everyone should play by the rules.”
Ezzell says the bills have the support of Gov. Susana Martinez [5], who has placed them “on the call” for the legislative session.
New Mexico’s horse racing industry has been rocked by a number of scandals, including a 2012 New York Times investigation [6] that called the state the worst in the nation for horseracing deaths.
The New Mexico Racing Commission has introduced a series of reform measures [7]in the past two years to crack down on trainers suspected of drugging their horses, including instituting the use of more frequent random drug tests and increasing the suspensions and fines against alleged violators.
“We’re concentrating on testing and we’re getting more hits,” said Vince Mares [8], the commission’s executive director. “Fines are increasing significantly. That’s a good sign.”
Papen and Ezzell have each introduced bills that would allow New Mexico racetracks to eject anyone whose license has been suspended or revoked for administering performance-enhancing drugs.
It would also protect race tracks from civil lawsuits from the people they eject.
Update 2/4: Ezzell’s House Bill 100 passed the House Health, Government and Indian Affairs Committee unanimously Tuesday. It now moves on to the House Judiciary Committee.
Currently, trainer Arnoldo Carrillo has filed a lawsuit [9] against the Racing Commission as well as four tracks that have barred him from running his horses — Sunland Park, Zia Park, Ruidoso Downs and Sunray Park.
The suit says Carrillo has been treated unfairly because it says he’s never had a horse test positive for banned substances nor faced “significant disciplinary action” from any track.
Carrillo’s attorney, Christopher Graeser [10]of Santa Fe, told New Mexico Watchdog on Monday that Carrillo has “a completely clean record” and that, short of a conviction, such bans “could put people like my client out of business.”
Papen maintains her bill will help clean up the sport.
“This statute would give the race tracks more teeth,” she said.
“I’m not going to say which track it is, but a horse was running mediocre in all the races it had been entered in,” Ezzell said, “and all of a sudden, it breaks out and beats everyone by over three seconds. (It) crosses the finish line and drops dead. Think there might be a problem? Yeah.”
Ezzell and Papen have also introduced a pair of bills [11]that would have a hearing officer to act on the commission’s behalf to make findings and hear appeals regarding doping allegations.
“We do not want these things to drag out in the courts,” Ezzell said. “We have one case in the courts that’s pending for over two years.”
Mares said the Racing Commission is looking into the details of the hearing officers bills before making up its mind to support them.
***

Monday, January 20, 2014

Paulick Report: AQHA Continues Push for Uniform Medication, Sanctions Violators


AQHA CONTINUES PUSH FOR UNIFORM MEDICATION, SANCTIONS VIOLATORS

1.18.14, Press Release
The Paulick Report
see full article here

In recent years, the American Quarter Horse Association has strengthened its commitment to safeguarding the integrity and welfare of American Quarter Horses, as well as the integrity and welfare of the entire horse industry.
In racing, this effort has included industry initiatives, such as supporting racing-centered equine research to increase knowledge and promote safety, but its major focus has been on addressing the use of illegal medications in the industry.
Since the initial medications forum meeting in 2010, there have been tremendous changes within the industry, with more on the way.
AQHA continues its involvement with the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium and supports the national movement through Racing Commissioners International for uniform medication rules. In 2011, AQHA offered an official position statement on the use of the medication Clenbuterol in racing American Quarter Horses. As a result, several states adopted or modified their rules to follow these regulations.
Racetracks have also increased security around major race days. As an example, Ruidoso Downs hired an elite security team through the Organization of Racing Investigators to keep an eye on the finalists of its All American Futurity and Derby races. Members of this team were also on hand for the Bank of America Challenge Championships at Los Alamitos.
Another major AQHA push was to implement the Racing Equine Health, Welfare, Integrity and Research Subcommittee, which keeps a close eye on topics related to the health and welfare of the equine athlete.
AQHA rule RAC311.3 in the Official Handbook of Rules and Regulations states “In addition to affording reciprocity to a racing authority, AQHA reserves the right to enhance the disciplinary action imposed against the person in question by imposing additional fines, suspending AQHA membership privileges and suspending participation privileges (both individual and horse) in AQHA-approved/recognized events. Should AQHA exercise such right to enhance a penalty, the disciplined individual may request a hearing before an AQHA hearing committee for the sole purpose of contesting whether the penalty originally imposed should be enhanced. The finding of a violation by a racing authority is not subject to review at such hearing and will be considered final by AQHA.”
“The EqHWIR will monitor each situation and work with state racing jurisdictions involving medications, abuse and other issues concerning American Quarter Horses,” the EqHWIR said in a statement “and, at the appropriate time, recommend penalties to the AQHA Executive Committee against the offender(s).”
AQHA has begun sanctioning trainers who have received medication violation penalties administered by racing jurisdictions. These violations are related to major Class 1 and Class 2 medication violations. AQHA’s actions stem from these penalties issued by the racing jurisdictions. The suspensions issued by AQHA are pending final outcome of their cases. There are currently 19 trainers suspended by AQHA for Class 1 or Class 2 violations.
The list of trainers who have been sanctioned can be found on AQHA’s Racing Welfare and Medication page.
Beginning January 1, 2014, AQHA implemented the Multiple Medication Violations System. This system sets forth penalties for trainers, owners and horses subject of positive drug tests, and, in particular, is designed to assess penalties against trainers, owners and horses subject of multiple positive drug tests. This system is for AQHA’s use only and is not intended to be a substitute for the current penalty system used by racing jurisdictions. It is based on the Racing Commissioners International’s multiple medication violations point system. The system rates points associated with various drug infractions and, subsequently, the penalties to be associated with them. The harshest penalties possible (for multiple major violations) include the indefinite suspension of membership (for a human) or registration (for a horse).
In addition, a link to an easily searchable database of medication violations will be available at the AQHA Racing website on the Racing Welfare and Medication page. These rulings can also be accessed atwww.thoroughbredrulings.com, which is searchable by trainer, horse, jurisdiction and breed.
Sale companies will be encouraged to publish points in the catalog or past performance supplements for horses entered in the sale and in race training or of racing age.
A medication forum discussing MMVS will take place at 8 a.m. on January 24 at Heritage Place in Oklahoma City. The forum is open to the public.
Full details of the MMVS are available on the Racing Welfare and Medication page.